Thursday, November 11, 2010

This Alaska subdivision ranges from the tree line along a frosty Dalton Highway to wet southeastern towns where native trees flourish but exotics are challenged by cool dull summers.

The sign reads, "FARTHEST NORTH SPRUCE TREE ON THE ALASKA PIPELINE -- DO NOT CUT." The tree has since died, but a new spruce can be seen a little farther to the north. The other bona fide tree species in this area (as opposed to the dwarf birches and willows) is Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera).

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Balsam Poplar is the northernmost tree to be found along the Dalton Highway.

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A Horsechestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) displays summer foliage on the grounds of Governor's Mansion in Juneau.

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Bigleaf Maple (Acer macrophyllum) near Ketchikan.

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Bigleaf Maple in Juneau.

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Norway Maple (Acer platanoides) in Anchorage. A 'Silver Queen' cultivar is in center; to its right is a partially hidden 'Crimson King.'

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Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) in Anchorage.

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'Crimson King' Norway Maple in Skagway.

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American Basswood (Tilia americana) in West Juneau.



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Norway Maple in Valdez.
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